Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Blue Buffalo Sued Over Alleged False Labeling, Again



Published:

 

Stephanie Douglas of Louisiana is the latest individual to join the class-action-lawsuit train against pet food manufacturer Blue Buffalo Company, alleging false or misleading advertising based on the company’s product labeling.

In fact, so many customers have filed class actions against Blue Buffalo that the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multi-District Litigation consolidated seven false advertising class-action lawsuits against Blue Buffalo so they can all be heard in court at the same time.

Douglas’ lawsuit was filed in the Parish of Orleans Civil District Court.

In her lawsuit, Douglas and others contend they purchased Blue Buffalo Company products in part because of the company’s True Blue Promise, which guarantees on the product label that its products are suitable for the ingredient-conscious pet owner and contain “no corn, wheat or soy” and “no artificial preservatives, colors and flavors.”

These ingredient claims were shown to be fraudulent, according to the plaintiffs, who had the Blue Buffalo products tested.

Blue Buffalo charges a premium for these all-natural products, the complaint says. However, scientific testing showed that Blue Buffalo Products do contain, at some instance or another, all of the aforementioned ingredients, the suit alleges.



As a result, Douglas and others in the suit were overcharged and mislead by the True Blue Promise and are seeking damages and restitution, including court costs.

Robert G. Harvey, Sr. and Donald C. Douglas, Jr. of the Law Offices of Donald C. Douglas, Jr. in Mandeville, La.
, are representing Douglas.

Its not just consumers who’ve had an ax to grind against Blue Buffalo, competitor Nestlé Purina PetCare of St. Louis claimed to have used a “sophisticated, independent lab” to analyze Blue Buffalo pet food to see if the company’s claims of “no poultry by-product meal.”

The tests, according to Purina, showed nine out of 10 Blue Buffalo products tested contained poultry by-product meal, such as feathers, leg scales and eggshells.

Furthermore, Blue Buffalo products labeled “grain-free” were found to contain grain samples.

Initially, Blue Buffalo scoffed at the Purina claims saying they were based on “junk science.”

This past May, a year after Purina filed a false advertising lawsuit against Blue Buffalo, the Wilton, Conn.-based pet food manufacturer admitted in court that a “substantial” and “material” portion of Blue Buffalo pet food sold to consumers contained poultry by-product meal, despite advertising claims to the contrary.

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags