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PIJAC Issues Statement on Use of Pet Vaccinations


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Cedric Clooth from Pixabay

The Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council (PIJAC) supports the judicious use of vaccines in pets in order to protect both animals and humans from disease and death, PIJAC president and CEO Mike Bober said in a statement issued in late August.

PIJAC’s view coincides with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians (NASPHV), the North American Veterinary Community (NAVC) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

“According to the AVMA, the development and use of vaccines within the last century has prevented death and disease in millions of pet animals, while also protecting human health,” Bober said. “The World Health Organization estimates that only one to two people die each year from rabies in the United States because of successful rabies prevention programs, while approximately 59,000 people worldwide die from this preventable viral disease.”

Bober advises that pet owners work closely with their veterinarian to determine an effective and safe vaccination program. The veterinarian can take into consideration the pet’s age, lifestyle, geographic location and any other risk factors.

“Antibody titers do not replace vaccination programs, but—for some diseases—may help your veterinarian determine whether your pet has a reasonable expectation of protection,” Bober said. “Pet owners should be aware that, within the United States, a positive test for rabies virus neutralizing antibody (RVNA) is not recognized as an indication of protective immunity.

“While pet owners may have concerns about over-vaccinating or side effects, the AVMA advises that serious adverse reactions are rare and outweighed by the disease protection benefits of vaccination,” Bober added. “It is also important to know that no reliable scientific evidence exists to indicate autism spectrum disorder exists in dogs.”

 

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