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Rover.com Unveils the Most Popular Dog Names of 2017



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The top baby names of and pop culture rank among the most popular sources for dog names, according to Rover.com’s fifth annual report of the year’s most popular dog names.

Food and political names trended down, missing the top tier this year. New sources of inspiration on the list include 2017 newsmakers like “Wonder Woman,” Taylor Swift and “DoggoLingo.”

Rover’s data revealed that now more than ever, Americans turn to popular culture for dog name inspiration. In 2017, 8 percent of all dog names were clearly pop culture-influenced. From “Stranger Things” to “Star Wars,” pet owners are naming their dogs after their favorite icons. Also, for the third year in a row, the top baby names of the year are among the most popular dog names. The humanization of dogs has been trending upward every year, with human-inspired names making up a whopping 44 percent of all dog names in 2017—up 57 percent from 2016.

Rover’s Dog People team of analysts dug into the data and discovered that Americans find naming inspiration in everything from internet slang and celebrities to vacation destinations.

Pop culture continues to influence dog names. A survey by Rover found 53 percent of dog owners reported having named a dog after a movie, book or TV character. And that number rose to 75 percent for millennials.

  • “Stranger Things” is more popular than ever. The name Barb grew 182 percent and Eleven grew 166 percent.
  • “Star Wars” names like Rey and Leia are up 70 percent this year.
  • “Game of Thrones”-inspired names, such as Khaleesi and Snow, are up 12 percent.
  • Americans were deeply inspired by strong female characters this year. “Wonder Woman”-themed names surged (up 45 percent) after the film took over the box office. The name Atwood spiked by 200 percent following the introduction of breakout series, “The Handmaid’s Tale.”
  • Pet owners also drew inspiration from popular celebrities—and their bad blood. The name Taylor beat Katy by 65 percent.
  • Additionally, “DoggoLingo,” an internet-created language fueled by love for dogs, is a new trend on the rise this year. The name Fluffer increased 500 percent, while names like Floof, Corgo and Woofer rose 52 percent.

A recent Harris survey revealed that 3 in 4 millennials would rather do something, particularly travel to a new location, than buy something. Millennials also make up 35 percent of dog owners in the U.S. Consequently, more than ever, pet owners are drawing inspiration from their favorite travel destinations, according to Rover.

The top city-inspired dog names were Sydney, Dallas, Rio, Phoenix and Savannah. The most popular state dog names were Georgia, Montana, Indiana, Maine, and Alaska.

Pet owners continue to love the ‘90s. Nostalgic names inspired by “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” the Spice Girls and “Harry Potter” made up 3 percent of all dog names this year. Additionally, the name Nirvana increased 171 percent, Kurt rose 46 percent and Daria grew 104 percent.

The top 10 names can be viewed on the infographic below. 

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